Saturday, June 30, 2012

Weekend wonderings: input from other fields?

Most genealogists bring experience in other fields to this one. Often you can maximize your contribution by not hiding your previous light under a bushel (as one friend has reminded me). Common cross-pollinating careers that I've encountered are historian, journalist, teacher, librarian, artist, technology expert, audio-visual technician, anthropologist . . .

What was your previous life? What's the most unusual contributing career you've encountered?


Harold Henderson, "Input from other fields," Midwestern Microhistory: A Genealogy Blog, posted 30 June 2012 (http://midwesternmicrohistory.blogspot.com : accessed [access date]). [Please feel free to link to the specific post if you prefer.]

4 comments:

Lori Lyn said...

I'm a statistician in the medical research field, and also earning a master's in history.

Debbie V. said...

I worked 5 years as a data and document processor for a clinical data mgmt company (pharmaceutical clinical trials) where the terms "enter as seen" were our mantra - even when it was obvious the person who was recording the data had made a mistake in spelling or facts. This training paid off when I began to do some transcribing for genealogy.

Becky Wiseman said...

Did some computer programming for a few years. Then worked on a software package for the Quality Control department the last 5 years before I retired. Detail oriented work that definitely translates into family history research.

Harold said...

Long-form feature journalist for a weekly, so I got accustomed to writing a lot. But one could employ a larger range of tones of voice there than in formal genealogy!